U mad? Or just hungry?

 

Normal humans make about 35k decisions on a typical day — and whether or not they’re good ones depends a lot on what our stomachs say.

You’re probably familiar with the idea of “decision fatigue” — the idea that each decision we make pulls from a single, limited pool of energy. But, how big of a pool we start from, and how fast we drain it, is impacted by a bunch of factors.

And recognizing when our “decision tank” is running low is crucial to making good judgments. AKA, not yelling at Sven, the intern, for bringing you a latte with 2% milk instead of soy.
HALT in the name of Sven

Human behavior expert Melody Wilding suggests using the “HALT system” to ask yourself whether or not you’re in any condition to make a rational decision.

The method boils down to taking stock of a few basic needs and asking yourself whether you’re:

Hungry: “Hanger” is real. Low blood sugar can make you feel anxious and cranky (take, for example, a study which found that judges ruled more harshly right before lunch). So before you scald someone with a boiling hot latte, grab a cheese stick.
Angry: If you’re actually experiencing non-food related anger, research shows that “venting” has “virtually no benefits,” and can actually increase negative feelings. Wilding suggests journaling or meditating to re-center. Dear diary, I hate Sven…
Lonely: Humans are social by nature, and turns out, the warmth of your laptop isn’t a replacement for human touch. If you find yourself spiraling, phone-a-friend, or take a break to grab coffee with a coworker.
Tired: Fun fact, going through life in a state of perpetual exhaustion isn’t sustainable. Having good “sleep hygiene,” (a nightly bedtime routine) is just as important as brushing your teeth.

HALT — It’s pretty simple stuff. And your interns will thank you.

Protecting your Phone from theft.

Cell phone’s today are no longer an optional in the business world. Being connected in today’s busy life is essential, whether it’s to use your twitter APP for outreach purposes or just to stay on top of your emails and DMs,  there is no way to avoid having a cell phone.

That being said, the rate of phone theft is up year after year and something is being done about it.

Percentage of U.S. cell owners lost or stolen in 2012 by age 

This statistics above shows the rate of cell phone owners [grouped by age] who have had their phone either lost or stolen in the USA during 2012. To no surprise the youngest group are more likely to have either lost or had their phone stolen. 45 percent of people surveyed aged 18-24 have had this happen to them at some point. Additionally 1 in 5 mobile phone owners age 65 and up  have reported having their phone stolen.

Source Statista 2018

A Program to Reduce Phone Thefts

In co-operation with carriers and governments worldwide the International Mobile Equipment Identity number (IMEI) was created as  part of a program to prevent cell phone theft.  An IMEI is your 15 digit number which identifies your wireless device.  By having this unique 15 digit number in a national database and hopefully a global database [still in progress] the objective is to discourage or even prevent thieves from stealing phones. When buying a phone there is many imei check services available online to find out if the phone has been is blacklisted or not.  When a cell phone is reported stolen it is blacklisted in this IMEI database making it essentially unusable on most or all network carriers locally and worldwide.